Archive for Author vet admin

Many Vietnam vets unaware of compensation available for exposure to Agent Orange, advocates say

Below is a summary for the article : Many Vietnam vets unaware of compensation available for exposure to Agent Orange, advocates say by Daily Hampshire Gazette

*Note: Image used belongs to GAZETTE STAFF/SARAH CROSBY

*Note: Image used belongs to GAZETTE STAFF/SARAH CROSBY

Thanks to the Agent Orange Act of 1991 passed by Congress, if a veteran spent even one day on the ground in Vietnam between Jan. 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975, he or she may be eligible for benefits related to Agent Orange-related illnesses.

Some 3 million men and women served the U.S. military in Southeast Asia, and no one is sure exactly how many were exposed to the herbicide, according to Vietnam Veterans of America.

Funds are distributed depending on the severity of a veteran’s illness.

Someone with a controlled case of diabetes might receive no money, but a veteran who loses mobility due to nerve damage caused by diabetes could get about $3,000 per month, which is at the top of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ range for disability payments, said Timothy Niejadlik, the director of the Upper Pioneer Valley Veterans’ Services District in Greenfield.

Benefits also are calculated according to a veteran’s dependents.

The Upper Pioneer Valley Veterans’ Services, a resource center on Main Street in Greenfield, will hold a town hall meeting open to all veterans throughout New England Saturday from noon to 4 p.m. at Greenfield Community College.

To apply for benefits, veterans can fill out an application on the VA’s website and must submit supporting evidence from their doctors.

Another Vietnam veteran John “Rob” Riggan, 73, of Buckland, who was diagnosed five years ago with prostate cancer, never had made the connection to his military service until he saw the Upper Pioneer Valley Veterans’ Services District flier on the wall at the post office in Shelburne Falls.

Since cases sometimes get backed up at the VA, some veterans find that it can take a long time to get a response, said Niejadlik, but they should be persistent.

“Even if the veterans have passed, even the spouse should come in because they could get a nugget,” he said.

 

To read more information, visit the original article : http://www.gazettenet.com/agent-organe-9040641
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Why A Nashville Handyman Service Went All In To Hire Veterans

Below is a summary for the article : Why A Nashville Handyman Service Went All In To Hire Veterans by Nashville Public Radio

*Note: Image used belongs to BLAKE FARMER / WPLN

*Note: Image used belongs to BLAKE FARMER / WPLN

Perhaps none have turned their attention to former service members like Nashville’s Hiller Plumbing, which has made Fort Campbell into almost a sole source of manpower.

They’re poking their heads under sinks, getting plumbing tips along the way.

“You know, everybody’s got four-year degrees, but no one knows the trades anymore.”

Burns didn’t consider a career in plumbing until Hiller approached him on post with this opportunity.

The skilled trades are finding former service members to be a good fit.

In fields like plumbing, national data shows a bigger shortage is looming as plumbers retire.

While kids in high school aren’t launching into the trades like they used to, Hiller contends many of them would be better off – solid pay and job security.

Around the country, HVAC, plumbing and electrical companies are experimenting with similar recruiting efforts, like a non-profit job board out of Minnesota called Troops to Trades.

Hiller has a leg up considering it runs its own for-profit trade school, Total Tech, where soldiers can spend their military educational benefits.

The government also subsidizes the living expenses of veterans during their apprentice period as plumbers and electricians.

 

To read more information, visit the original article : http://nashvillepublicradio.org/post/why-nashville-handyman-service-went-all-hire-veterans
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St. Cloud VA To Host Job Training Fair

Below is a summary for the article : St. Cloud VA To Host Job Training Fair by WJON

*Note: Image used belongs to Getty Images

*Note: Image used belongs to Getty Images

ST. CLOUD – Veterans looking for new career opportunities in the area should stop by the St. Cloud VA Friday.

The St. Cloud VA is hosting a job training fair from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. in the VA auditorium, to help veterans get ready for their future careers.

Business attire, haircuts, and beauty kits will be available for Veterans free of charge.

Following the preparation fair, a Veterans Job Fair will be held on May 5th from 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the VA auditorium.

 

To read more information, visit the original article : http://wjon.com/st-cloud-va-to-host-job-training-fair/
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County to aid veterans in job search

Below is a summary for the article : County to aid veterans in job search by Ottumwa Courier

*Note: Image used belongs to Winona Whitaker

*Note: Image used belongs to Winona Whitaker

OTTUMWA – Veterans will find help landing jobs locally when Wapello County becomes the 47th county to team up with Home Base Iowa.

HBI acts as a liaison between veterans and businesses to help veterans find employment after leaving the service, Danny Simonson said in a presentation to county Supervisors Tuesday.

Simonson, the veterans representative for Iowa Workforce Development, told supervisors that the goal of HBI is to keep veterans in Wapello County when they return from deployment by connecting them with local employers who can use their specific skills.

Veterans can search for businesses on the HBI website and let businesses search for them.

According to Simonson, 260 veterans have resumes on HBI. Simonson said businesses and communities in HBI counties offer incentives to veterans to look for work in their counties.

In Appanoose County, Honey Creek Resort offers hotel rooms to veterans who visit Appanoose County to search for a job, Simonson said.

Simonson stressed the importance of having a contact person to help vets find information about schools and housing “If they’re not from here and looking to locate here.” The contact person would send information about Wapello County and its resources to veterans requesting information from the website, Simonson said.

Simonson asked supervisors to approve a resolution to make a partnership with HBI official and to actively take part in the program, create a point of contact in the county and encourage businesses to offer incentives and hire veterans.

Supervisor Greg Kenning asked for HBI’s help to link HBI resources to the county’s website, and Supervisor Chair Jerry Parker said the county would need guidance to set up the program in Wapello County.

“We still would want to get more employers involved,” said Simonson, and to add incentives to the packets that veterans receive from participating counties.

 

To read more information, visit the original article : http://www.ottumwacourier.com/news/county-to-aid-veterans-in-job-search/article_c412a4a2-247f-11e7-b9d5-83c6ac58423a.html
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Fifty years after the Vietnam War’s bloodiest battles, the ‘lucky ones’ are gathering for what could be a final reunion

Below is a summary for the article :Fifty years after the Vietnam War’s bloodiest battles, the ‘lucky ones’ are gathering for what could be a final reunion by Washington Post

*Note: Image used belongs to Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post

*Note: Image used belongs to Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post

Some lasted only a few days in Vietnam – two were killed Oct. 14, 1967, the day after they arrived, according to a classmate who knew them.

A few still have mementos of the war – faded telegrams sent to their families, a memorial card from a friend’s funeral, snapshots of themselves in Vietnam.

This year and next year, when most of the men served, mark the 50th anniversaries of some of the bloodiest months of the Vietnam War.

The two years account for almost half the 58,000 names on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, which honors those killed by the war.

Barents had been in Vietnam about 10 weeks and had yet to see much action.

In Vietnam, he wrote Kathryn regularly and discussed, among other things, whether she should get her hair cut before they met in Hawaii when he had R&R. “I wouldn’t mind if you cut your hair for Hawaii,” he wrote her nine days before he was wounded.

The fighting in Vietnam often came in such close quarters that it was too dangerous to ask for an artillery attack, lest Americans be hit.

They included his Quantico classmate, 2nd Lt. George M. Broz, who had been in Vietnam a month.

Now, a month later, during the fight for Lam Xuan just south of the demilitarized zone dividing South and North Vietnam, he was leading a squad of Marines after another lieutenant had been killed by mortar fire.

Callanan underwent surgery – the first of many over the years – to have shrapnel removed and internal damage repaired, and shipped back to St. Albans Naval Hospital in New York City, where he would be for almost six months.

 

To read more information, visit the original article : http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/local/2017/04/29/fifty-years-after-vietnams-bloodiest-battles-the-lucky-ones-are-gathering-for-what-could-be-a-final-reunion/?utm_term=.581621d6256a
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Workers who provide services to veterans and their families just took a pay cut

Below is a summary for the article : Workers who provide services to veterans and their families just took a pay cut by WUWM

*Note: Image used belongs to http://wuwm.com

*Note: Image used belongs to http://wuwm.com

The standard line about the American military, be it from politicians, celebrities or bumper stickers is “Support our troops.” But hundreds of the people who do that by helping service members, veterans and their families in what are called Family Assistance Service Centers just took a huge pay cut because of a new federal contract.

She talked with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about what these workers do and what is happening now that their wages have been cut.

Catherine Rampell: Essentially, they provide services or they connect soldiers, airmen, veterans, military families with various kinds of services, legal, financial or otherwise.

Ryssdal: And now, for I guess the third time in the last three four years, the contract between the National Guard Bureau and these centers has been adjusted, and the workers are quite literally paying the price.

Not actually for the family assistance centers, but other kinds of government contract workers who do various kinds of services to help military families.

In each of these three recent contracts, the new company won the bid by changing the classification of these workers to something that was lower paid.

There are about 400 people who were affected by these pay cuts.

Ryssdal: How much of a pay cut are we talking about here?

In some cases, people lost about half of their hourly pay.

Actually an outside organization, Good Jobs Nation, they advocate basically on behalf of government contract workers, have filed a complaint with the Labor Department, asking the Labor Department to investigate and look into whether these people are misclassified.

 

To read more information, visit the original article : http://wuwm.com/post/workers-who-provide-services-veterans-and-their-families-just-took-pay-cut#stream/0
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What Recent Executive Orders Mean for Texas’ Military Community

Below is a summary for the article : What Recent Executive Orders Mean for Texas’ Military Community by UT News

*Note: Image used belongs to news.utexas.edu

*Note: Image used belongs to news.utexas.edu

After applying pressure to national officials, veterans groups recently scored a victory when the secretary of veteran affairs said that many of the more than 2,000 open VA jobs would be considered by the VA to fall under “Public safety” exemptions to the executive order calling for a federal hiring freeze.

The negative impact of a federal hiring freeze and other recent executive orders on Texas’ military community is far from contained.

Federal jobs have long appealed to veterans, who have preferential hiring, can combine years of military service with federal service to work toward 20-year retirement, and can easily translate military rank into commensurate General Schedule grades for federal postings.

Nationally, 50 percent of veterans will have a period of unemployment within 15 months of separation from active duty service, and the veteran unemployment rate is 40 percent higher than the nonveteran rate.

Closing another avenue for jobs that offer preferential hiring of veterans could impact veteran unemployment in our state for years to come.

Other executive orders and the resulting infighting among state leaders is also harming Texas’ veteran population.

The ramifications of these executive orders could have been easily anticipated by veteran and military stakeholders.

The governor’s office’s doubling down on these policies, coupled with one of the largest military and veteran populations in the country, means Texas will be extremely impacted by any negative ramifications of these policies on the military community.

Veterans groups need to continue to pressure state leaders, Congress and the new presidential administration to make military families a factor.

Jennifer Aronson is an active duty military spouse and the project coordinator for the Veteran Spouse Network at the Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health at The University of Texas at Austin.

 

To read more information, visit the original article : https://news.utexas.edu/2017/04/04/executive-orders-hurt-texas-military-community
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Are you a veteran? The government wants to give you up to $80,000 to go to school

Below is a summary for the article : Are you a veteran? The government wants to give you up to $80,000 to go to school by Barrie Today

*Note: Image used belongs to barrietoday.com

*Note: Image used belongs to barrietoday.com

Veterans will be eligible for up to $80,000 to pay for college, university or technical education under a program announced this morning by the federal government.

“If education truly is the great equalizer, as I believe it to be, being the son of two school teachers, then this new Education and Training Benefit will be a game changer for Canada’s Veterans and their families,” Hehr told a news conference.

“They’ll have access to coaching for job search, labour market assessments, information on education and training requirements to reach their career goals. All from coaches who understand military culture,” explained Hehr.

The new education and training benefit introduced will help Veterans transition from military careers by returning to school after service.

“Soldiers will have the opportunity to go back to the college or university of their choice within ten years of release from the military. It will cover up to $40,000 in tuition and other costs for members who have served six years and $80,000 for members who have served 12,” said Hehr.

Georgian College President and CEO MaryLynn West-Moynes told the crowd Georgian has many students with a military background.

Several veterans who are already attending Georgian College attended the announcement.

Bob Munroe, who served 36 years in the Canadian Forces, was a bit leery about applauding the news just yet.

“It is a tough transition from military to civilian. Education is important so while we get trained in the military a lot of our skills aren’t necessarily transferable so if we can come back to college and learn new marketable skills I think that’s awesome.”

The government allotted $133.9 million over six years to create the new Veterans’ Education and Training Benefit.

 

To read more information, visit the original article : https://www.barrietoday.com/local-news/are-you-a-veteran-the-government-wants-to-give-you-up-to-80000-to-go-to-school-591080
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Aussie veterans struggle to get jobs

Below is a summary for the article : Aussie veterans struggle to get jobs by The Daily Telegraph

*Note: Image used belongs to dailytelegraph.com.au

*Note: Image used belongs to dailytelegraph.com.au9

The former rifleman is one of the 30 per cent of 5500 servicemen and women who leave the defence forces each year who end up unemployed.

This statistic is revealed in an alarming report to be released today by WithYouWithMe, a company that matches veterans’ skills with new careers.

A medical discharge increased the likelihood of unemployment, but veterans with no medical problems still faced a jobless rate of 11.2 per cent, almost double the national rate.

Those who did find work faced an average 30 per cent drop in income from their ADF wages.

He’s now refining his skills to find a career more in tune with his abilities.

The Veteran Employment Report also highlights underemployment, with 19 per cent of veterans underemployed in jobs beneath their abilities, estimating the cost to the economy at $130 million a year.

Former bomb-dog handler and two-tour Afghanistan veteran Corporal Brett Turley was in that position when he left the army in 2013.

“I asked myself, ‘Do I want to be doing this in 10 years?’ … I wanted something more meaningful,” he said.

The Veteran Employment Report analysed Department of Veterans Affairs and ABS data on more than 20,000 people who left the ADF between 2012 and 2016, and the experiences of WithYou-WithMe participants.

Former lieutenant Tom Moore founded the program last year because of his own frustrations when he left the army in 2015.In Afghanistan he led a 60-man combat team but on returning he secured just 15 job interviews from 100 applications and had no luck.

 

To read more information, visit the original article : http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/adf-veterans-who-put-their-lives-on-the-line-for-australia-face-battle-to-find-work-after-service/news-story/991eefa9d8f754df87af445d8d24061f
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Moorestown teen organizes job expo for veterans

Below is a summary for the article : Moorestown teen organizes job expo for veterans by Burlington County Times

*Note: Image used belongs to burlingtoncountytimes.com

*Note: Image used belongs to burlingtoncountytimes.com

MOORESTOWN – Veterans converged on the Moorestown Community House on Monday looking for career opportunities with the help of a township teenager.

Craig Ambrose, 16, organized the job expo for veterans to help them find work and adjust to civilian life after service.

Craig, a sophomore at St. Augustine Prepartory School in Richland, Atlantic County, spent five months recruiting about 20 local businesses and vendors to attend, including Bayada Home Health Care and Weichert Realtors in Moorestown, as well as the Philadelphia Phillies.

Men’s Warehouse in Maple Shade donated suits to give to veterans.

Craig volunteered at a similar event last year set up by a friend, Maddy Morlino, and seniors at Moorestown High School.

Maddy has since graduated, but Craig felt it was his responsibility to make the job expo an annual tradition.

With the knowledge that they could find themselves without a job one day, the veterans came to the job fair to see what options were available.

It can be difficult for veterans to acclimate themselves into civilian life after decades of service, but employment can help them find a sense of stability, the vets said.

Brisson said the training veterans go through equips them with organizational and collaborative skills that can make them marketable to employers.

Although Ferrie has a job, he’s already eyeing potential employers if he finds himself in need of another.

 

To read more information, visit the original article : http://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/news/local/moorestown-teen-organizes-job-expo-for-veterans/article_896ee5d8-28f1-11e7-b3de-97a8fac0dc1a.html
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